Faith Ringgold @ the Serpentine Gallery

‘I can’t get through the world without recognizing that race and sex influence
everything I do in my life.’ Faith Ringgold

Cycle through London’s diesel-polluted streets to the Serpentine Galleries for the launch of the second of two exhibitions showcasing the art of American woman artists. This one is a ground-breaking survey of the work of African-American woman artist Faith Ringgold.

Jazz Stories: Mama Can Sing, Papa Can Blow #1: Somebody Stole My Broken Heart (2004) by Faith Ringgold © 2018 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York, Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York

Faith Ringgold’s biography

The press release includes a potted biography of the artist, thus:

Faith Ringgold was born in Harlem, New York in 1930 (so she is currently 88 years old).

Faith Ringgold is an artist, teacher, lecturer and author of numerous award-winning children’s books.

Faith Ringgold received her BS and MA degrees in visual art from City College of New York in 1955 and 1959.

A Professor Emeritus of Art at the University of California in San Diego, Ringgold has received 23 Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees.

Ringgold is the recipient of more than 80 awards and honours including the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, The American Academy of Arts and Letters Award and recently the Medal of Honour for Fine Arts from the National Arts Club.

In 2017, Ringgold was elected a member into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Boston.

Ringgold’s work has been shown internationally, most recently:

  • in the group exhibition Soul of A Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, Tate Modern, London (2017)
  • We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965 – 85, Brooklyn Museum (2017)
  • Post-Picasso Contemporary Reactions, Museu Picasso, Barcelona, Spain (2014)
  • American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960’s, the Neuberger Museum, Purchase, New York (2011)

Ringgold’s work is in the permanent collections of numerous museums in the United States including:

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Museum of Modern Art
  • Whitney Museum of American Art
  • Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
  • The Brooklyn Museum
  • The Studio Museum in Harlem
  • The National Museum of American Art, Washington, DC
  • The Art Institute of Chicago
  • The Boston Museum of Fine Art

Politics

Ringgold’s art is drenched in politics, specifically American race politics, from the Civil Rights Movement through Black Power to Black Lives Matter. And in feminism, the women’s movement, from women’s liberation through to the #Metoo movement. Almost all her works have a subject, and that subject is political in intention, either publicly and polemically political, or more subtly personal, implicit in the stories of her extended families and their experiences as black people in America.

The Flag is Bleeding #2 (American Collection #6) (1997) by Faith Ringgold. Private collection, courtesy Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London © 2018 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

As the press release puts it:

For more than five decades, Ringgold has consistently challenged perceptions of African American identity and gender inequality through the lenses of the feminist and the civil rights movements. As cultural assumptions and prejudices persist, her work retains its contemporary resonance.

Hence she has produced series of works with titles like ‘Slave Rape’ and the ‘Feminist series’, and ‘Black Light’, and works like ‘Woman Free Yourself’.

Protest and activism have remained integral to Ringgold’s practice since she co-founded the group the National Black Feminist Organization in 1973 along with her then 18 year-old daughter, Michele Wallace.

In her earliest works in the 1960s, the ‘American People’ series (1963-67), Ringgold took ‘the American dream’ as her subject to expose social inequalities.

By the 1970s, Ringgold, along with her daughter, was leading protests against the lack of diversity in the exhibitions programme at New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art. Forty years later her work was included in an exhibition at the same museum, on the subject of protest.

Fifty years after her earliest work, she published in 2016 We Came to America, a children’s book that celebrates cultural diversity. From start to finish her art is concerned with the political implications of black life in America.

And as a white man viewing the exhibition, I have no doubt African Americans were horribly oppressed – through centuries of slavery, the inequities of the Reconstruction period, the Jim Crow laws, lynchings, segregation in the Deep South which lasted well into my own lifetime – and that Ringgold’s work is testimony to the enduring hurt and trauma of the suffering of the black experience in America right up to the present day.

But… well… I feel I have watched so many documentaries, been to so many exhibitions, watched so many movies and TV shows and read so many books about the suffering of African Americans that, horrible and true though it all is… well…The subject is certainly not new.

And also, although her treatment of it is sometimes harsh and explicit, more often it is oblique, with a lot of emphasis on Ringgold’s own personal experiences and the stories of her extended family.

And also the nature of the art itself – the use of soft and even luxurious fabrics – tends to soften and mediate the impact of a lot of what she’s saying.

The art

What I’m struggling to define is that I found the subject matter of many of the works less interesting than the form and the variety of experiments in form and presentation which Ringgold has made throughout her career as an artist rather than as a political activist.

Rather than shaking my head at the atrocities of slavery and institutional violence against African Americans, I more often found myself nodding my head at the inventiveness and exuberance and optimism of much of her art.

Roughly speaking, the works came in four shapes or styles:

  1. Paintings
  2. Posters
  3. Tankas
  4. Quilts

These four can be divided into a simpler binary division – before and after the tankas.

1. Paintings

Her earliest works appear to be fairly traditional paintings, mostly of people, contemporary Americans, done in a naive, kind of cartoon Modernism. The earliest works here come from the ‘American People’ series, which mostly depict white bourgeois figures with more than a hint of irony or satire.

As such, some of them sort of reminded me of Weimar satire from the 1930s. The reduction of this woman’s neck and boobs to circles and tubes, and the deliberately garish unnatural colouring reminded me of 1930s Picasso.

American People #9: The American Dream (1964) Faith Ringgold. Private collection, courtesy Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London © 2018 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

There are about ten or so of these early paintings and their feel for design and layout, and their type of super-simplified, Henri Rousseau-style, naive figuration is extremely beguiling.

American People #15: Hide Little Children (1966) by Faith Ringgold. Private collection, courtesy Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London © 2018 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York

As the 60s progressed Ringgold created a series titled ‘Black Light’ which took the same kind of stylised human faces, but experimented with casting them in varying shades of black and brown. Literally investigating the changing effects of blackness and brownness in painted portraits.

2. Posters

By the later 1960s the social situation in America had become revolutionised, not least for African Americans, with the much more aggressive Black Power and Black Panther groups replacing the peaceful, early 60s, Christian activism of Martin Luther King’s civil rights movement. Also, the Women’s Liberation movement was inaugurated and spread like wildfire through a generation of frustrated, intelligent women, impatient at being pigeon-holed, stereotyped, objectified and held back in every area of civil life.

Ringgold responded to this explosion of activism by creating banners and posters with stark textual messages, such as ‘Woman Free yourself’, ‘Woman Freedom Now’, ‘United States of Attica’ (a response to the uprising at Attica Prison in New York State where 2,000 prisoners seized hostages and held out for four days till the state police took back control in a pitched battle in which 43 people were killed [10 staff, 33 prisoners]).

The posters use cut-out paper to create vibrant text against jangling colours, as well as offset prints and silkscreen techniques. Text, colour, patterns and shapes.

Woman Free Angela (1971) by Faith Ringgold

Next to the posters are hung a series of images from the same period (1970-72) depicting the American flag – ‘The People’s Flag Show’ as well as ‘United States of America’ – a map on which has been written every instance of anti-black police brutality. Politics, black anger.

There’s one titled ‘Judson 3’ which refers to the following event:

In 1970, there was a Flag Show that took place at the Judson Memorial Church on Washington Square Park, for which Faith designed the poster. The show, after massive participation on the part of artists in New York, was closed by the Attorney General’s office. Faith, Jon Hendricks and Jon Toche were arrested and charged with Desecration of the Flag. As a consequence, they were dubbed the Judson 3. They were subsequently vindicated of all charges on appeal by lawyers who were assisted by the American Civil Liberties Union. It was an important case for Freedom of Speech among artists.

So Ringgold herself was directly, personally, physically involved in the kinds of protests and events she celebrates.

The urgency of the commitment to political issues at the end of the 60s, which found expression in posters, placards, banners, mottos and logos, reminds me of the banners and posters being made at exactly the same time by the nun-turned-artist Corita Kent, who was recently the subject of an eye-opening exhibition at the House of Illustration at King’s Cross.

3. Tankas

So far so bold, brash and colourful. But her career takes a massive and decisive shoft with the discovery of fabrics. 

The story goes that Ringgold was on a visit to Europe and in a museum in Amsterdam looking at the venerable art of the Old Masters, when someone suggested she take a look at a nearby display of tankas.

tanka is a Tibetan hanging tapestry made of cotton or silk which contains or frames a painting of Buddhist deities, scenes, or a mandala. Tankas are generally portrait-shape and very, very big.

In a flash Ringgold realised this represented a liberation from the western white male tradition of the Oil Painting.

Here was something which broke with traditions of painting, of a discrete privileged image contained in and defined by a heavy gold frame and hung on a wall to be admired by millionaire owners.

Here was a way of presenting images within a much more populist, accessible, craft setting – and in a way which created a much more complicated interplay of fabrics and textures and mixed surfaces.

Almost immediately after the trip, in 1972-3, Ringgold made a series titled ‘Feminist series’ which explores this new medium. The oriental origin of the form appears to be reflected in:

  • the tall narrow format
  • the impressionistic treatment of trees and forests
  • and the use of text (as in the posters) but written vertically, in the Chinese style, completely against the western tradition

In the example below, note the way a) the main image is painted in acrylic but b) embedded in a fairly complex surround of fabrics c) the way it is designed to be hung and so has a loop of fabric at the top allowing a metal bar like a curtain rail to go through it and d) there are braided tassels hanging from each end of the curtain loop. (N.B. There is some text in the blue sky at the top of the painting, descending vertically as I mentioned, and conveying a feminist message – but too small to be legible in this reproduction.)

Feminist Series: We Meet the Monster #12 of 20 by Faith Ringgold (1972) Acrylic on canvas framed in cloth

A door had opened. From this point onwards, all of Ringgold’s work right up to the present day involves greater or lesser amounts of fabric.

A few years later (in 1974) she produced a series titled ‘Windows of the Wedding’, experiments with using the fabric surround of the tanka to frame purely abstract geometric shapes. In just a decade she’s come from the semi-Weimar satire on white people in America through to these multi-textured, abstract and fabric experiments. A hell of an odyssey.

Installation view of Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Galleries © 2019 Faith Ringgold. Photo by the author

Installation view of Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Galleries © 2019 Faith Ringgold. Photo by the author

The five examples of the series in the exhibition take up one wall and create a restful, if complicatedly decorative effect. But they appear to be quite unique in her oeuvre in being the only works on display here which do not depict the human face or figure. It was nice to sit and watch them for a while. Ringgold is known – perhaps over-known – for her black consciousness and feminist messages but I’m glad the curators showed that there is also this other, purely decorative side to her output.

In the final room we jump forward nearly 40 years to 2010, when she produced another series of tankas, each of these ones centring an iconic black figure, painted in a faux-naive style in the centre and surrounded with relevant text from a sermon or speech or text by the figure (too small to see in this photo).

Each portrait is embedded in a decorative arrangement of flowers, or just zoomorphic shapes, and this square it itself embedded in a luxurious velvet fabric which really makes you want to reach out and stroke them. As you can see each tanka is suspended from a green wooden rod at each end of which hangs a couple of golden tassels. Made me think of Muslim prayer mats or rugs… Certainly a tradition very different from Rembrandt in a gold frame.

From left to right, they are:

  • Coming To Jones Road Part 2: Martin Luther King Jnr Tanka #3 I Have A Dream (2010)
  • Coming To Jones Road Part 2: Sojourner Truth Tanka #2 Ain’t I A Woman (2010)
  • Coming To Jones Road Part 2: Harriet Tubman Tanka #1 Escape To Freedom (2010),

Installation view of Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Galleries © 2019 Faith Ringgold. Photo by the author

4. Quilts

And then there are the quilts. Melissa Blanchflower, the show’s curator, explained that Ringgold’s great, great grandmother Susie Shannon, who was born into slavery, was made to sew quilts for plantation owners. On the slave plantations slave women were often set to sew and create quilts for the master’s family. It was collaborative work, many women working on the same quilt. The quilts might bear all kinds of images, from Christian imagery, through to fairy tales or folk stories, as well as improving mottos. The women might also sew in coded messages.

The skill was passed down the female line of the family to Ringgold’s mother, who was a fashion designer, so that Faith grew up with the sight and smell and touch and shape of all kinds of fabrics, and a feel for what goes with what, what compliments, and what jars and offsets – for the world of effects which can be created by pre-designed fabrics.

The difference between the tankas and the quilts is that the former are designed to be hung while the latter end up being hung but can also be laid flat. The real innovation is in the use of the apparently passive ‘feminine’ format of the quilt for all kinds of vivid, angry and emotive social messages.

Take the emotive series titled ‘Slave Rape’. In this photo you can see:

  • Slave Rape #1 of 3: Fear Will Make You Weak (1973)
  • Slave Rape #2 of 3: Run You Might Get Away (1973)
  • Slave Rape #3 of 3: Fight To Save Your Life (1973)

Installation view of Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Galleries © 2019 Faith Ringgold. Photo: readsreads.info

If you described the subject and the figure’s facial attitudes and postures in words, your auditor might expect them to be dark and harrowing but, as you can see, they are brightly coloured, and the figures done in Ringgold’s characteristic faux-naive style are almost (I hate to say it) pretty.

Only the titles bespeak the atrocities they commemorate. And, after I’d looked at the human figures, and enjoyed their interplay with the jungle foliage around them, my eye tended to forget the ostensible subject matter and wandered off to enjoy the fabrics – the use of variegated fabrics in the surrounds, materials which could easily be offcuts of curtains or sofa coverings, but which, sewn together in subtle asymmetries, provide a pleasing counterpoint to the central narrative figures.

In later quilts Ringgold revived the use of texts from her poster days to weave together her personal stories and writings with the history of African Americans. ‘Who’s afraid of Aunt Jemima?’ from 1983 was her first ‘story quilt’, made up of alternating squares containing schoolgirl-style depictions of members of her family, and numbered squares of text, which tell the story of her early life.

Installation view of ‘Who’s afraid of Aunt Jemima?’ by Faith Ringgold at the Serpentine Galleries © 2019 Faith Ringgold. Photo: readsreads.info

There are half a dozen or so of these story quilts from the later 1980s and they combine a complex interplay of hand-written text with painted imagery, embedded in patchworks of fabric, to create a profound impact – a sophisticated, politically alert reworking of a time-honoured, and family tradition.

Works from the 1990s, such as the ‘American Collection’ series (with titles such as ‘We Came To America’ and ‘The Flag is Bleeding’ [the second image in this review, above] combine all the techniques she has mastered, to create images of greater violence and intensity. After the hope of the 1960s, life for many urban American blacks seems to have become steadily bleaker, more drug addicted and violent, and the experience of immigrants to America more fraught and dangerous.

And yet the same period saw the far more relaxed, vibrant and optimistic series ‘Jazz Stories: Mama Can Sing, Papa Can Blow’ (first image in this review).

Ringgold has reflected her times, and the rise and cultural spread of the two great social movements of black power and feminism over the past fifty years, but there is also – within her voice or brand or oeuvre – a surprising variety of tone and style.

Arriving back at the ‘American People’ series from the 1960s you are staggered at the journey she has been on, and by all the things she has seen and felt and expressed with such confidence and imagination. She did it her way. She did it with style. Inspiring.

Interview with Faith Ringgold

A conversation between Faith Ringgold and Serpentine Artistic Director Hans Ulrich Obrist.

In fact, being a grand old lady of American art means there are scads of videos about Faith Ringgold and many illuminating interviews with her.


Related links

  • Faith Ringgold continues at the Serpentine Gallery until 20 October 2019

Books by Faith Ringgold

Shes quite a prolific author, too.

Reviews of other exhibitions at the Serpentine

Michael Craig-Martin’s tour of his exhibition, Transience @ the Serpentine Gallery

At the opening of his new exhibition, Transience, at the Serpentine Gallery in London, Michael Craig-Martin gave a tour of the gallery and answered questions. He is a warm, humorous presence, unpretentious, a tremendous communicator, and the more he talked the more depth and interest and variation and meaning his paintings acquired.

I was lucky enough to be there and these are my notes of what he said. (This post is twinned with my review of the show.)

Origins

In 1978 Craig-Martin began to do black and white drawings on walls, no colour involved, just outlines. He emphasised that the more you persist with something in art, the more likely you are to find interest and depth in an approach and so it was with these simple line drawings of everyday objects – he began to see more and more possibilities. When he started doing these line drawings as a form of experiment in the 1980s he had no idea it would turn into ‘a life’s work’, and end up defining him and his style…

Installation view of Vertigo by Michael Craig-Martin (1981) at the Serpentine Gallery. Photo: Simon Port

Installation view of Vertigo (1981), Untitled (card reader) (2015) and Untitled (electric sockets) (2014) by Michael Craig-Martin at the Serpentine Gallery. Photo: Simon Port

Painting objects

He stopped painting in the 1980s for several years, but when he returned to it in the 1990s, he began by painting entire rooms and then sequences of rooms. He found that integrating the earlier line drawings onto coloured walls created a surprising variety of effects. Thus the thirty or so pieces in this exhibition explore the permutations and, once you start looking closely, you realise there are significant differences between:

As you walk around the show, you begin to realise the large number of permutations this apparently ‘simple’ approach permits.

Craig-Martin said he was ‘interested in what these objects allow me to do in the language of image making.’ So they are, among other things, exercises and experiments in image making. Explorations. (Although the works are very obviously paintings, I was struck how Craig-Martin referred to them consistently as ‘drawings’.)

Transience by Michael Craig-Martin at the Serpentine Gallery - installation view

Installation view of Untitled (headphones medium) (2014) and Untitled (x box control) (2014) by Michael Craig-Martin at the Serpentine Gallery. Photo: Simon Port.

Subject matter

As to the subject matter of the drawings, he said he started off drawing what was around him – shoes, a garden fork, a book. But one of the things that doing this for over thirty years slowly made clear is how the nature of ‘everyday’ objects has changed significantly.

For a start, most objects these days are branded, which is thought-provoking…

More obvious is the way many of the technological objects have become obsolete. Someone asked why all the drawings are of technological subjects (there are only two which aren’t – an image of a McDonalds pack of fries and a trainer). He explained that the works on show have been selected precisely to highlight the changes in the world of technology over the period of their creation, the period from the early 1980s to the present day which broadly covers the massive change from the analogue to digital technology.

Hence the title of the show – Transience. And hence one of the earliest pieces is a massive painting of a portable analogue TV – Untitled (television) 1989 – a product which no longer exists. Without intending it, Craig-Martin’s oeuvre has turned into a sort of memento mori of vanished objects, vanished lifestyles, vanished worlds…

Colour

He wants the moment of viewing the object to be intense, to be memorable, he wants the painting to command the space. That’s why the colours are so strong. He explained that, although computers can generate millions of colours there are in fact only ten key ones. Do his colours have a special name or are they a certain type? No. He only uses colours with a name: red, yellow, pink, magenta.

So they are the simple obvious colours, he just ensures that his use of them is pure, intense and deep. The canvas is completely covered in multiple layers with no shading, no perspective or aspect. It is as rich and as vibrant as can be.

The result is a particularly powerful insight: he is interested in creating a tension between the stability of the drawings and the intensity of the colour applied to it. This helps to explain the paintings’ strange hypnotic power. Order and passion. Stasis and excitement.

Michael Craig-Martin explains his work at the Serpentine Gallery. Photo: Simon Port

Michael Craig-Martin explains his work at the Serpentine Gallery. Photo: Simon Port

Wallpaper

The vast central room is painted deep green. Other walls are white or pink. But the opening couple of rooms are covered in a Craig-Martin wallpaper created specially for the show (you can see it in the photo above). He pointed out two interesting features of the wallpaper:

  1. It is seamless. He discovered a firm in Austria which creates wallpaper designed for specific environments which is run off to the required size and shape and not in sections or pieces.
  2. The characteristic outlines of the objects depicted do not overlap. I’d never have noticed if he hadn’t pointed it out, but they all touch each other as if they are balanced in an incredibly precarious construction. Fragility. Evanescence.

Symmetry

The room layout of the newly refurbished Serpentine galleries is tremendously symmetrical. Craig-Martin thinks he’s never worked in such a symmetrical building. To suit the space the works themselves are carefully balanced and Craig-Martin likes the way, among other things, this draws attention to the huge central room, in which hangs the largest work in the show, Eye of the Storm (2003) over three metres tall by 2.8 metres wide, and a kaleidoscopic summary of objects and colours.

Installation view of Eye of The Storm (2003) by Michael Craig-Martin at the Serpentine Galley. Photo: Simon Port

Installation view of Eye of The Storm (2003) by Michael Craig-Martin at the Serpentine Galley. Photo: Simon Port

Narrative and value

He ascribes no value to the artefacts in his drawings. They aren’t particularly favourite objects or chosen for any special reasons. He isn’t an especial fan of industrial design promoting this or that look or style. He is merely a ‘witness’ of the objects in the world around him.

The way technologies have become obsolete has created a narrative of time and change which he never intended when he started. The possibility of something like a show titled Transience only slowly emerged from the drift of time.

And, at the end of the tour, Michael was quick to point out that the paintings need no narrative because human beings pack everything they see or do or hear with meaning and narrative. The gallery is a clean open space in which each of the visitors’ lives, histories, stories, memories and intentions jostle and brim.

Installation view of Untitled (smoke alarm) (2014), Untitled (hotel door handle) (2014) and Untitled (light bulb) (2014) by Michael Craig-Martin at the Serpentine Gallery. Photo: Simon Port

Installation view of Untitled (smoke alarm) (2014), Untitled (hotel door handle) (2014) and Untitled (light bulb) (2014) by Michael Craig-Martin at the Serpentine Gallery. Photo: Simon Port

(I asked him why all of the pieces are labeled Untitled but then have brackets after describing what they depict eg Untitled (Chips), Untitled (battery), Untitled (bulb). He explained they are all untitled precisely to avoid creating assumptions, to keep them as free from connotation as possible. Yes, but why then give them titles in brackets? Well, he replied with a big smile, we have to be able to tell them apart somehow 🙂

Outside the gallery is a sculpture of a light bulb, nearly 4 metres high, cast in powder-coated steel, and in Craig-Martin’s favourite magenta. If you stand in the right place you can make it frame nearby Kensington Palace. In his tour Craig-Martin offered a casual insight which clarified it when he said, it isn’t a sculpture of a lightbulb. It is a sculpture of a drawing of a lightbulb.

Lightbulb (magenta) (2015) by Michael Craig-Martin

Lightbulb (magenta) (2015) by Michael Craig-Martin. Photo: Simon Port

This exhibition is FREE. It is big and bright and beautiful, the perfect antidote to the dark, wet winter. Go and see it.

Related links

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