Jessa Fairbrother: Constellations and Coordinates @ the Photographers’ Gallery

If you visit the Photographer’s Gallery (just off Oxford Street, in central London) the main exhibitions on the upper floors are well signposted, but it’s easy to overlook the existence of the print room exhibition space down in the basement.

Here they display works by up-and-coming photographers which you can not only admire but buy. (They also have a back catalogue of works by other photographers associated with the gallery, which you can order as prints, framed or unframed.)

The print room is currently hosting a small but beautifully formed exhibition, the first major solo show of British artist Jessa Fairbrother, titled Constellations & Coordinates.

Constellation 6 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers' Gallery

Constellation 6 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers’ Gallery. £1,750 + VAT, including frame

Jessa takes stylish black and white photos of herself posing naked, in a range of positions suggestive of ballet or yoga, poses which are always dynamic, in which her body, bent forward or backward with outstretched arms expresses a powerful sense of yearning, stretching, reaching, straining. The sense that it is just a body is emphasised by the fact that in every single photo her head is turned away, her face almost always hidden, we certainly never see her eyes and so, in that basic sense, never engage with her self or soul. Instead we are confronted with the (female) body as living sculpture, arranged and posed so as to emphasise patterns and arrangements.

(Quite apart from all other considerations I wonder where she got the ideas for all these positions, they’re surprisingly varied and yet at the same time have a kind of formal unity. They don’t seem haphazard and are the opposite of casual. They’re not exactly religious but they radiate a sense of discipline, the sense of a range of hieratic poses being worked through methodically. From a book of yoga postures, or stretching exercises?)

Anyway, what lifts the photos from being just very attractive nude studies is the fact that Jessa then embroiders the prints to create the sense of swirling, whirling patterns of minuscule dots or holes. Imagine a lace doily. Then imagine a lace doily superimposed over a photo of a naked woman. That’s the effect.

Constellation 9 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers' Gallery

Constellation 9 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers’ Gallery. £1,750 + VAT, including frame

One series of ten or so photos is titled Constellations, the other series is titled Coordinates. What’s the difference? The Constellations are in black and white, the Coordinates are in colour. To quote the gallery guide:

In Constellations (2018), Fairbrother punctures the surface of the print creating intricate lace like patterns around the photographed figure, inspired by religious icons and ancient sculptures of female deities. The raised pattern also echoes braille embossing, suggesting a more tactile consideration of the work and alternative readings.

Coordinates (2019) emerged from a fascination with the systems we employ to make sense of the world. Fairbrother uses a needle and thread to trace her own emotional topography by sewing directly on to the photography of her own body, revealing hidden contour lines.

So in the black and white ones a needle or some kind of implement is used to perforate the print and create the intricate curving abstract patterns of tiny holes across the surface of the print – while in the colour ones, coloured thread is sewn into the print in order to create ovals, bands, halos and triangles made up of hundreds of tiny flowerhead shapes. In both types the flat surface of the original print is damaged, manipulated, altered, to create a new work.

Coordinate VII 2019 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers' Gallery

Coordinate VII 2019 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers’ Gallery. £2,150 + VAT, including frame

The use of colour does at least two things.

One, quite obviously, is that it makes the basic component, the image of the naked female body, a lot more candid, brutal, realistic. The black and white photos distance the image, giving her body the abstract beauty of Greek sculpture, plain, white, marmoreal, detached and also somehow dated – any black and white image carrying the suggestion that it is historic, distant, from the past, any stylish black and white nude evoking, for me at any rate, memories of Man Ray’s wondrous nudes from the 1930s.

This sense of distance, of detachment, is echoed or emphasised by the nature of Fairbrother’s decoration of the black and white shots. The stippled effect of the doily patterns is muted and subdued, understated, with two results: the patterns blend in with the white surface of the body – from even a little distance away they begin to disappear; you have to lean right in to enjoy the amazing detail of the patterns. Connected to this is the way the patterns are more extensive; because they are more subtle they can afford to cover almost her entire body ( see Constellation 9, above).

The colour works in the Coordinates series make a sharp contrast in every way to these elements. Colour photography is a lot less forgiving, a lot more explicit of detail. Thus – to highlight an apparently trivial detail – in the colour photos you can see Fairbrother’s moles. You can see the rosy colour of her nipples, the brown shade of her pubic hair, the way her white belly and chest give way to the pink or rose colouring of her neck and throat.

In other words, her body has lost the abstract, statue-like quality it had in the black and white shots. It is very much the body of a young white woman, alive, now.

The second impact of colour is the way the use of coloured thread as the medium of patterning makes a startling difference from the mute, understated quality of the stippling in the black and white photos.

The patterns made up (mostly) of coloured flower or star shapes really dominate the images. They risk making the images seem too hectic or busy. Looking at them again and again I can see that Fairbrother has had to be much more sparing of the coloured patterning. Less is more.

Whereas in a piece like Constellation 9 (above) almost every inch of her body is covered in patterning, you can see how in a piece like Coordinate VII (above) very little of her body is covered with the flower shapes. Because the colour patterning is so much more dominant, a new equilibrium, a new dynamic has to be established between the power of the body and the power of the design.

This maybe explains why, in the colour works, the main focus of the pattern is not on her body. Instead, the colour ones tend to feature abstract patterns emerging from, or surrounding her body.

These are of three types: first of all the circular halo of flower shapes surrounding her head (as in Coordinate VII , above). Then there are the ones where an isosceles triangle of flower patterns is bursting from or superimposed from her shoulders or chest or stomach.

Coordinate VIII 2019 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers' Gallery

Coordinate VIII 2019 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers’ Gallery. £2,150 + VAT, including frame

And the final type is where her body is placed within a large oval of flowers which fills the picture and reminds me of an old-fashioned Victorian or Edwardian picture frame.

In all of these oval frame pictures Fairbrother is upright and facing away from us, stretching out her arms and leaning forward. Maybe she discovered that the oval frame required symmetry, and so didn’t go with the other, mostly asymmetrical, poses which she uses in almost all the other works.

Coordinate XII 2019 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers' Gallery

Coordinate XII 2019 by Jessa Fairbrother © Jessa Fairbrother. Courtesy of the Photographers’ Gallery. £2,650 + VAT, including frame

In all the colour shots it is also noticeable that although her body has some decoration on it, it’s nowhere near as much as the all-over stippling of the black and white works. It’s almost as if the use of colour decoration calls into being a different way of seeing, or of thinking about shapes and patterns. It’s almost as if the harshness of colour, as a photographic medium, requires or invokes or inspires or suits a correspondingly harsher geometry.

Thoughts

I think these are marvellous. I was entranced. They attract on multiple levels. At a most obvious level Fairbrother has a very attractive, sexy body. As a heterosexual man I acknowledge that I enjoyed the sight of it very much. At a slightly higher level, I was fascinated by the variety of poses. I do stretching exercises at the gym, and could imaginatively feel my way into many of the positions and poses she adopts and was intrigued by their source: did she just make them up?

Beyond that, as I noticed that you never see her face I realised that she was deliberately refusing what you might call a human, emotional, candid encounter, the kind we all have when we see someone’s eyes and assess their thoughts and feelings in a million ways. The consistent choice not to show her face amounts to an aesthetic decision to distance her self from her body, to make her body into an expressive medium, a tool for her art, an object to be arranged for aesthetic effect.

And then I was fascinated by the way that the choice between black and white or colour created a whole cascade of stylistic and aesthetic consequences – which can be summarised as ‘black and white subtle, zoomorphic and sensuous’, ‘colour more brutal, geometric, shiny, brash’.

As has probably become clear by now, I preferred the black and white works titled Constellation, finding them subtler, more understated and, once you leaned in to really look, full of far more rich and complex patterns than the colour ones. But I can also appreciate how the colour ones would suit a different mood, more energetic and brassy. They are more dynamic in the aesthetic sense, meaning there is a greater range of colour, tone and image (colour itself being a form of energy, and the nearly regular geometric shapes of circle, oval and triangle possessing a dynamically mathematical energy). But – now I look yet again – I think in many of the colour ones she is actually moving, tossing her head back so her hair swings backwards.

Different styles for different moods.

Like all great ideas this perforation and embroidering of photographs is stunningly simple, once someone has done it and shown it to you. What a great idea, and how brilliantly she has executed it. Deeply enjoyable.


Related links

Reviews of other photography exhibitions

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