Vasantha Yogananthan: A Myth of Two Souls @ the Photographers’ Gallery

When visiting the Photographers’ Gallery in Soho you are generally signposted towards the big exhibitions on the top three floors, so it would be easy to overlook the fact that there’s also a small exhibition space down in the basement.

Downstairs, next to the gallery’s extensive book shop, is the Print Sales Gallery where you can buy and order prints of a wide range of photographers, and where they also showcase the work of new and young photographers.

Currently three walls of the room are livened up by fifteen big, bright, digital prints by Vasantha Yogananthan.

Seven Steps, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

Seven Steps, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

Born in 1985 in France of Sri Lankan extraction, Yogananthan as a boy was read stories by his father, including the Indian legend of The Ramayana. First recorded by the Sanskrit poet Valmiki around 300 BC, the Ramayana went on to become one of the founding epics of Hindu mythology. The poem narrates the struggle of the divine prince Rama to rescue his wife Sita from the demon king Ravana.

Prince Rama travels the length of the country to find his wife, along the way meeting characters who have become embodiments of virtue and honour in Indian society. The story ‘touches on universal themes of violence, discrimination and infidelity’.

When Yogananthan first visited India in 2013, he came face-to-face with the pervasiveness of myth and legend on the subcontinent. In a land steeped in ancient history, folklore and veracity are deeply intertwined, and attempting to disentangle the two can be futile.

‘I realised the distinction between truth and falsehood wasn’t important,’ says Yogananthan. ‘This was an important discovery for me, that this is where my photographs should lie – in this in-between world between physical reality and the imagined.’

And it occurred to Vasantha that he could use the ideas and motifs of the Ramayana as the inspiration and buried sub-text for a series of photos he could take of present-day India. The photos could be posed or staged in order to illustrate, or comment on, scenes and situations from the classic poem.

Longing for Love, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

Longing for Love, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

The result is A Myth of Two Souls, an ongoing photographic project, which records Yogananthan’s journeys across India, capturing the impact and pervasiveness of this omnipresent cultural myth on everyday Indian life. As the press release puts it:

Working exclusively in analogue, using large or medium format cameras that intentionally slow down the creative process, Vasantha’s projects are generally developed over long periods of time and harness a distinctive colour palette based on natural light.

Juxtaposing colour and hand-painted photography, the series interweaves fictional and historical stories, old and new traditions and offers a lyrical photographic reimagining of a classic tale and sits somewhere between documentary, fiction, mythology and reality.

The goal of the project is eventually to produce seven books of photos, corresponding to the seven books of the Ramayana, to be published over three years. Some of the photos were taken in black and white and then Yogananthan had them hand tinted by traditional Indian artists, resulting in a subtly distinctive Indian use of colour.

The colours, creamy and diffuse, match Yogananthan’s palette, but some details seem a little off – oversaturated tones, purple skies, and luminous shades of skin. The unearthly sensation this creates intensifies the sense of invention, the blurring of the line between fabulation and realism.

Twin Wings, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

Twin Wings, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

On the two occasions I’ve been to India it was very full, packed and teeming with human life.

In contrast, Yogananthan’s photos are very big and very beautiful but often very empty. Even when there are human figures in them they appear rather spectral and this, along with the slight disorientation produced by the hand-tinting, conveys an eerie sense of ghostliness, of wordless presences haunting an other-worldly landscape.

Vanar and Markat, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

Vanar and Markat, from the series A Myth of Two Souls by Vasantha Yogananthan © Vasantha Yogananthan

Simple, easy, accessible and wonderful to look at. Prints of all 15 works can be bought in varying sizes at prices ranging from £1,400 to £4,000 (+ VAT).


Related links

Reviews of other Photographers’ Gallery exhibitions

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