Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne (1759-68)

Everything in the world is big with jest.

This is sort of embodied in Vol VII where Tristram flees Death heading South to warm France and ends up dancing with a beautiful gypsy girl. Or in Vol IX where he gets fed up of trying to tell the story of Widow Wadman & Uncle Toby & cuts to himself in the south of France listening to the postillion telling him the touching story of the unhinged country girl…

Tristram Shandy was published in 5 instalments: Vols 1&2; 3&4; 5&6; 7&8; 9. It came out annually between 1759 and 1768. Like Harry Potter.

The book is made of a number of elements. For me Sterne grasps two particularly profound aspects of ‘the novel’: the ambiguous role of the narrator; the arbitrary and thus ludicrous function of chapters.

[It must be said that, for all its tomfoolery, Tristram Shandy emphatically partakes of Ian Watts’s ‘formal realism’ every bit as much as Crusoe or Pamela: almost more so in that the characters are taken to be real people, with realistic names, in a realistic setting, behaving in silly but ultimately plausible ways].

The Digressive Narrator

Sterne noticed the centrality of the narrator as a puppetmaster in Fielding’s novels. But Fielding can be relied upon to return to the plot: what if the narrator didn’t return? What if he wandered off all over the place, constantly distracted?

Why would he do that? Two reasons:

  • Brain damage – as outlined by Walter Shandy p.296: Tristram’s animal spirits are dispersed at conception; then his mother seethes with resentment for 9 months; then his head is squashed by Dr Slop’s forceps. No wonder his mind wanders.
  • Locke’s theory of associations: Locke provides an intellectual underpinning for the novel’s divagations with his theory that the mind, the understanding, works through chains or trains of associated thoughts. Thus Walter’s learned obsessions e.g. with names and noses, and Toby’s notorious obsession with fortifications.

Thus we arrive at the easy paradox that the main body of the text is made of digressions and diversions.

Learned Wit

The tradition of learned wit i.e. using learning for comic effect by:

  • exaggeration
  • complexification
  • absurdity

Apparently the critic D.W. Jefferson coined the phrase ‘learnèd wit’ to characterise the tradition from Rabelais thru Cervantes to Sterne.

Thus Walter Shandy can be a receptacle for the most reconditely learnèd obsessions, and this provide a peg for the most ludicrous displays of abstruse learning, of the utterly useless medieval variety e.g. the long disquisition on noses and the quote from Slawkenbergius’s tome on same; or the treatise on swearing…

Chapters

Along with the key role of the unbalanced narrator, Sterne has grasped the key role of chapters in ‘the Novel’ i.e. their implicit absurdity. Any chapter break by any author in any novel is a huge, improbable, highly artificial, interference by the author in a narrative. Sterne plays on this insight for all it’s worth: once he’s discovered he can declare that he will have a chapter on a specific subject, there is no end to the nonsense of promising chapters on every subject under the sun:

There is no end in trying experiments upon chapters. (p.311)

Bawdy

A sexual understanding underpins the entire novel. It opens with the split second of Tristram’s conception: from then on there is a permanent risk that any remark he makes will have a sexual innuendo.

Innuendo is a question of creating a context, a mood, an atmosphere in which even the most prosaic or innocent remark can be misinterpreted as sexual in meaning. This is a question for pragmatics i.e. context over logical content.

  • It begins with sex
  • Uncle Toby’s wound in the groin is a source of endless innuendo
  • The debate about why Mrs Shandy did not want Dr Slop to come too close to her ****
  • The hot chestnut on Phutatorius’s penis (needing to be warped in a wet sheet from his new book about concubines!)
  • The crude summary of Vol IV Chap 8 as having been about chambermaids, a green gown (deflowering a virgin) and an old hat (the vagina)
  • The sole purpose of the story of the abbess of andouillets is to get a pair of nuns shouting Bugger and Fuck
  • The story of the mule leads abruptly to Tristram’s breeches being slashed and, strongly implied, his pecker falling out

Sterne was friends with John Hall-Stevenson, a rake and libertine, who lived in Skelton Castle (nicknamed Crazy Castle) where they held pale copies of the Medmenham Hellfire Club, under the name of the Demoniacs. J H-S appears as the character Eugenius throughout; at the end of Vol III the debate, supposedly called to discover whether Walter can change Tristram’s name – after he was accidentally baptised Tristram by Yorick – back to the intended Trismegistus, but which instead discusses whether a child is at all related to its parents, with the incident of Phutatorius and the hot chestnut in the groin, can be taken as a comic account of the Demoniacs, with appropriately Rabelaisian names (Mr Kiss-Arse, for example).

The Imagined Reader

In fact a variety of imagined readers are created in order to give Sterne numerous opportunities for turning the text into a dialogue. I suppose Bakhtin’s notion of the heteroglossia of the text is relevant ie it contains multiple voices in permanent dialogue. The actual dialogues are on a variety of subjects:

  • Bawdy, where he comically deflates what appeared to be a bawdy moment
  • Invocations, e.g. a prologue, preface, dedication
  • Critics, who are invoked to give their opinions

Thus the book can be said to have a far larger cast of characters than merely the named half dozen.

Decorum

We are always taught that the Augustans valued decorousness of literature and art more than any other age i.e. had a highly worked-out sense of the fittingness, the appropriateness, of various sentiments to literary forms. And yet this is the age with a strong parallel tradition of burlesquing and parodying this formality, from Pope’s satires to Fielding’s use of burlesque and parody.

Everybody agreed The Epic was the highest form (just as History painting was the highest genre). Which makes it the more striking that no Augustan considered themselves capable of one. Pope and Dryden translated Homer. But their age – the late 17th and early 18th centuries – saw the heyday of the mock epic. Among the most famous examples are Samuel Butler’s Hudibras, John Dryden’s Mac Flecknoe and Absalom and Achitophel, and Alexander Pope’s Dunciad. A key source of the humour is the delivery of low matter in a highflown style. Fielding used this repeatedly in his novels, starting with the mock epic invocation or paean. He saw his novel as ‘a comic epic poem in prose’. Sterne simply represents this tradition taken to an extreme where the actual content

Death

Sterne was ill all through the writing of Tristram Shandy. Various characters die:

  • Yorick: and his tombstone
  • Brother Bobby
  • Tristram, in the middle of describing Trim & Toby’s campaigns on the bowling green, end of Vol VI, has a morbid vision of Trim attending Uncle Toby’s funeral
  • All of Vol VII appears to be Tristram trying to outrun death by fleeing to France. There’s a Shandy moment when Tristram’s adult flight overlaps with his boy-ish Grand Tour accompanied by Walter, Toby et al. But this volume feels strangley rushed and hysterical…

Timescale

1698 Uncle Toby injured at the siege of Namur
1700 Toby & Trim’s 1st year of building fortifications in the bowling green

Tristram’s conception

Tristram’s birth i.e. Obadiah bumping into Dr Slop, Tristram’s bungled delivery i.e. squashing his nose
Tristram’s christening by the vicar
Tristram’s penis is cut off by the window sash when Susannah made him pee out of the window because the maid forgot to put a chamber pot under the bed

Example of the wandering narrative

We never get to find out how Tristram’s brother, Bobby, died. Instead Walter is inspired to deliver a moving panegyric to him, so moving he forgets about his son’s actual death – and Mrs Shandy bursts in, misunderstanding what is going on – and we cut to Corporal Trim’s extempore eulogy in the servants’ quarters – which leads to a meditation on the dropping of his hat – and so on, but never back to Bobby…

Characters

  • Tristram Shandy
  • (Jenny, his consort)
  • (Eugenius, his friend)
  • Walter Shandy, his father
  • Mrs Shandy, his mother
  • Toby Shandy, his uncle
  • Bobby Shandy
  • Corporal Trim (James Butler)
  • Yorick the vicar
  • Dr Slop, the Catholic doctor
  • Susannah
  • Obadiah
  • Jonathan the coachman
  • The scullion
  • Didius – member of the Demoniacs
  • Phutatorius – member of the Demoniacs

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe (1719)

The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe of York, Mariner: who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an uninhabited Island on the coast of America, near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. With An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver’d by Pirates. Written by Himself

Providence & Fate The main theme of the book is Crusoe’s destiny; how he conspires against his own interest.
Style Enormous long rambling paragraphs.
Theme Crusoe’s rebellion against God & insistence on a cursed fate.
Kindness

  • The captain of the Guinea ship deals fairly with him
  • Crusoe deals honestly with the negroes on the Africa shore on his escape from slavery
  • The Portuguese captain who rescues him serves him handsomely
  • Crusoe is considerate of Xuri, only selling the boy when he says he wants to go to the kind Portuguese captain
  • Crusoe is heartbroken by the young kid after shooting its mother
  • He is fond of his 2 cats & dog

Crusoe is born in 1632 (ie it’s set several generations in the past, like all Defoe’s novels).
Age 18 Crusoe argues with his Dad who argues for the sweetness of the middle station in life.

Voyage 1 Takes ship on a whim in Hull. Shipwrecked off Yarmouth. Captain of ship says he’s cursed. Refuses to acknowledge it. Hangs around in London.
Voyage 2 Goes aboard a ship to Guinea; makes £400 by exchanging trinkets for gold. Leaves it with the widow of the Guinea captain who had died.
Voyage 3 Sets sail again. Off the Canary Islands captured by pirates from Morocco. Made a slave for 2 years to the captain of the ship in Rabat. Allowed to row a pinnace out to get fish, one day he provisions it, sails out, throws the adult Moor overboard, keeps the boy Xuri with him. Sails south round Africa towards the Cape Verde islands for about 4 weeks. Various stops for water; shoot animals; encounter negroes who leave food & water for them.
Rescue Picked up by a Portuguese boat, dealt with very fairly by the captain; sells him Xury.
Brasil With the money made from selling the Portuguese captain his pinnace & animal skins Crusoe sets up as a plantation owner for 4 years. Sends via the Portuguese captain to the widow who sends on his money plus metal tools.
Slavery a) buys a slave as soon as he has the money b) tells his friends all about the items including slaves to be bought cheap on the Guinea coast. So Crusoe is on a slave-trading voyage when he is wrecked. He sets off September 1st, 8 years after leaving his parents in York.
The Storm The storm & wreck & Crusoe’s swim to shore is fantastically vividly described.
The Island of Despair He calculates he set foot on the island on 30th September 1659.
Salvage Crusoe has 14 days or so to salvage goods from the ship which he does very thoroughly. Vivid description of manoeuvring the raft into the small river; on one trip it is upended; on another he has to brace it with his back till the tide lifts it off sand: vivid.
Base then he builds his base: he finds a lawn 100 yards wide in front of a sheer rock face with a slight concavity in it; erects a tent before the concavity, a palisade of stakes, ramped up with turves, and a roof; digging back into the cave to create his kitchen.
Journal He keeps a journal until his ink runs out, from 30 September 1659 till …
The barley which he throws away sprouts! Providence!! – though it fades when he realises it has a purely secular explanation.
Earthquake collapses the roof of his cave; and he sees half the cliff face fall away in the distance.
Fever He gets a fever; malaria etc.
Other side of the island Crusoe follows the river upstream till he reaches its source, then climbs over a peak into the other side of the island: much nicer, like a garden: tobacco, grapes, lemons grow there wild.
Bible He finds a bible among the chests and has a profound religious conversion – he is born again, realising he is saved by the blood of the lamb etc.

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